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for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by th
on the "newshour": bradley manning gets 35 years in jail; how the n.s.a. spies on internet activity and eleanor holmes norton looks back at the march on washington. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: an egyptian court today ordered the release of ex-president hosni mubarak. a hearing was held at tora prison, where the ailing 85-year-old has been detained for two years. once freed, he'll be placed under house arrest on orders of egypt's prime minister. mubarak also faces charges of failing to prevent the deaths of protesters in the 2011 uprising that ousted him from power. meanwhile the european union held emergency talks on the egyptian crisis in brussels. its foreign policy chief, catherine ashton, said the e.u. member nations strongly condemn the recent spate of violence between the interim government and supporters of the muslim brotherhood. >> we've agreed, as well, to review the issue of our assistance to egypt with the understanding of assistance to the most vulnerable groups and to civil society must continue. member states have agreed to suspend e
. it is devast>> spying on americ. the nsa says that was a mistake. >> these are tools that are enemies,to be used on not on americans. >> radley manning. the escalating war on obamacare. >> under no circumstances will i for a continuing resolution that authorizes even one penny to this. >> and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. >> you look at how far we have come, but we still have so far to go. >> opposition forces claim the syrian government is killing large numbers of civilians, men, women and children with chemical weapons. russia says the rebels stage the attacks to drum up opposition to the asad regime. the asad regime says the claim is baseless. here is what president obama said a year ago. nowe have communicated in uncertain terms what every player in the region -- with every player in the region that that is a line -- red line for us. >> senator john mccain says the red line threat is a joke. >> the president of the united states says it would be a red line and a game changer. he now sees that as a green light. means the word of the president of the united states
. obama and the nsa overhaul. >> i wanted to ask you about your evolution on the surveillance issues, even as recently as june you said that these -- the process was such that people should be comfortable with it, and now you are saying -- you are making these reforms and people should be comfortable with those. so why should the public trust you on this issue and why did you change your position multiple times? >> well, i think it's important to say -- i haven't ainvolved in my assessment of the actual programs. in light of thing changed environment where a whole set of questions have been raised, some in the most sensationalized manner possible, where these leaks are released drip by drip, one a week, to kind of maximize attention, and see if they can catch us at some imprecision on something. in light of that, it makes sense for us to go ahead, lay out what exactly we're doing, have a discussion with congress, have a discussion with industry, which is also impacted by this have a discussion with the civil libertarians and see, can we do this bert. >> that was president obama facing skep
snowden? his lawyer will not say, but he did confirm the fugitive nsa analyst has been granted temporary asylum in russia and has left the airport transit area. >> what concern is his place of residence? he will choose it himself. he can live in a hotel or an apartment. he is one of the most wanted people on earth. they will make sure his place of residence is absolutely safe. >> snowden could attempt to reach countries who have offered him asylum. >> latin america is a far way off in more ways than just geography. >> it's snowden stays in russia, he could become a stumbling block in u.s.-russian relations. washington wants moscow to extradite snowden to face charges of espionage and the theft of class of five nsa documents, but that is something the russian government has declined to do. >> where might snowden be? is he safe? for more, let's cross over to our moscow correspondent. do we have any idea where snowden may be and what his conditions are for him in russia? >> his whereabouts are still the big secret that is not revealed due to security reasons. for told the last image was a m
pwas given asylum in moscow. i expect him to talk about the issue and answer questions on the nsa civilian -- nsa surveillance program, to explain it because there is a growing distrust in the u.s. when it comes to privacy. from what i can speculate -- i think also he will touch n the peace talks between israelis and palestinians. >> in washington with our crystal ball, thank you very much. >> let's not forget that this cooling of relations resulted from russia granting asylum to nsa whistleblower edward snowden. now in a related story, a secure e-mail service thought to be used by snowden has been abruptly closed down. the service, lavabit, appears to have made the decision to shut itself down rather than comply with demand by the government to provide access to customer information. >> the company owner said in a statement, "i have been forced to make a difficult decision -- to become complicit in crimes against the american people or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down lavabit." u.s. president barack obama has spent part of the week huddling to brainsto
: overreach at the n.s.a.; a planet-hunter goes dark; opening up a pristine rain forest to oil drilling; shields and brooks on the week's news; plus, harper and musslewhite on playing the blues. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> reporter: the number of dead in thursday's car bombing in beirut, leban, went up at least 22 today, with more than 300 wounded. it was the deadliest attack there in nearly three decades, engulfing a busy street in fire and smoke. the site is near a complex where the shiite militant group hezbollah holds rallies. today, the group's leader, sheikh hassan nasrallah, blamed sunni radicals. he pledged to double the number of hezbollah forces helping fight sunni rebels in syria. a sudden wave of refugees from syria is pouring into northern iraq. u.n. refugee officials reported today that many come from aleppo, syria's largest city, and their numbers approach 8,000 a day. they've been crossing at a new bridge over the tigris river. there already are more than 150,000 syrian refugees registered in iraq. wall street ended a tough week on a dow
. >> consequences are being drawn from the nsa's global spying for graham. the foreign ministry has announced it is ending a kids- old surveillance agreement. it was a joint understanding. >> the decision comes as new reports show cooperation -- corporations working with authorities to gather private data. companies developed software to help in the surveillance. >> britain's a guest spy agency. it is reported to have even paid telecommunications customer need companies to snoop on customers. the data lines are utilized by internet users by other countries. >> we must untangle this web. intelligence agencies are the responsibility of the government. if private companies are involved that can only happen under special circumstances. >> german lawmakers want to know more about the spying revelations and what the government knew about british and american snooping activities. chancellor merkel's chief of staff is to be grilled again in 10 days time. >> how significant is the cancellation of the intelligence agreement with london and washington question mark this had been in the works for a while
disclosed by nsa leaker edward snowden show a massive amount of money set aside for u.s. spying operations outside the cia or the nsa. amen jaifers joins us with me. sounds like a spy novel. >> absolutely. this is one of the most grossly held secrets of the intelligence, how much does it spend on the things that it does, how many employees does the united states intelligence community actually have? they want to keep that secret. thanks to this leak from edward snowd snowden, "the washington post" broke a blockbuster story and detailed for the first time what exactly is in the budget for the intelligence committee, including more than 21,000 employees at the cia. the first time we've seen this level. >> very fascinating reading that story. i know you looked over it. what stood out most for you? what do we know now more than before? >> in this era of drone warfare around the world, the cia reporting a 14.7 billion-dollar budget, that makes it the biggest component for a long time folks thought maybe the cia was no longer the dominant player in u.s. intelligence, maybe the national spashl in
the top intelligence agents. they want to know how they aided programs directed at citizens. the nsa affair has been laid to rest. he has given the parliamentary intelligence committee written confirmation that it never broke german law. the nsa does get information from germany, collected by the intelligence agency. it gathers information in many parts of the world. >> the data is almost exclusively data on foreign activities. >> the opposition parties said that they have a duty to protect parties. the u.s. -- they want to know more about how the u.s. software works. >> we still do not know how it works. what privacy rights are being threatened? how much information is the u.s. collecting on german citizens? >> the government says it will continue to ask washington about what is going on and answer the concerns of the german public. the need to regain voters trust. >> inspectors have arrived to investigate claims that they have been used. >> they will spend the next two weeks gathering evidence but stopped short of determining who is responsible for any of the alleged attacks. >> ea
next month. voters are angered i the allegations that the nsa targeted the massive spying program and the german government was complicit. the government is fighting back. >> germany's foreign intelligence service, ded, uses its installation in bavaria to survey the world. some of that information is shared with the national security agency from the u.s.. in parliament, a scandal. the social democrats want access. and it is the center-right that says that it was these social democrats who came up with the information sharing all they were in government. >> this agreement is based on a policy decision from the former chancellor and chief of staff. >> under chancellor gerhard schroeder, he was responsible for cord knitting the agencies. today he serves as the chief of a parliamentary group. this is seen as a campaign issue ahead of the general election next month. it cracks -- >> it is total hypocrisy for the spd to be outraged at the cooperation between the nsa and the dd. >> they say that the government is trying to dodge the implications. >> germany is one of the top arms exporte
today and said he doesn't think the leaker from the nsa, edward snowden, is a patriot and released a series of reforms he would like to implement. here is how the president described what he would like to do. >> we can't and must be more transparent so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. we have already declassified unprecedented information about the nsa but we can go furter. >> and asked about who he'll pick for the next chairman of the federal reserve he said he didn't want to tip his hand of who he would pick but has two candidates and explained why the white house was defending larry summers in public. take a listen. >> the perception that mr. summers might have an inside track simply had to do with a bunch of attacks that i was hearing on mr. summer's preemptively, which is a standard washington exercise that i don't like. >> reporter: so tyler, obviously, this is very personal for the president. he has a relationship with larry summers. he didn't like to see the piling on. that might explain leaks we saw
: the release comes amid reports of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him begins. we examine how that choice could affect the economic recovery. >> brown: egypt's government ordered police to take all means necessary to disband protests in support of the ousted president. margaret warner explores the potential for violence and the actions of the new military rule. >> ifill: and in india, child labor is outlawed, but a staggering number of children still toil away. fred de sam lazaro reports on efforts to change that practice. >> the combination of official and middle-class indifference, and dire poverty, drives perhaps 50 million children into the workplace. some as young as six or seven. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committe
of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him
whether dependency on the nsa has become too great. >> italy's supreme court upheld a ruling for berlusconi. it could 3 the government into crisis. judges upheld a jail sentence and that's automatically reduced to a year to the law aimed at reducing overcrowding in prison. they recrewed the second part of the sentence, a foof-year ban from public office. >> that are i argued that berlusconi used offshore companies to buy the rights for u.s. movies. they said he lied when declaring how much he paid and avoided about $9 million in taxes. he said in a video message that the fraud he had been convicted of is cleompletely unfounded. he has the second largest party in the ruling government and the ruling could destabilize a shaky coalition. >> the leaders ofity low's baghdad government warned protesters to end their sit-ins. members of morsi's power base in the muslim brotherhood are not backing down and call on reports after friday's prayers and two squares in the capital. they are placing sandbags on roads to the squares to block security forces. some say they will not leave even
the magnitude of the nsa surveillance program and also had some effect on politics. two very different cases when it comes to handling the content of them. >> thanks so very much. here in berlin, police have been keeping protesters apart on the third day of demonstrations over a newly opened center for up to 400 asylum-seekers. tensions flared and there were arrests when supporters sought to end a rally by anti- immigration groups. >> the number of asylum seekers in germany has almost doubled year on year to over 52,000. the issue of immigration, surprisingly, is not a major topic of discussion in the campaign ahead of the september 22 election. >> many of the refugees come from conflict zones. afghanistan or serious. but they have not found peace in germany. this is what they have to put up with. opponents make their views clear. most of them clearly belong to the far right. on the other side are those who support the refugees. the atmosphere is heated. every day, more protesters arrived, wanting to show that the majority of germans are not xenophobic. >> i think it is important we make a c
documents obtained from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. they claimed the n.s.a. also bugged the european union's offices in washington. in china, disgraced political figure bo xilai now awaits the verdict in his corruption trial. in closing arguments today, bo denounced the two main witnesses against him. he charged his wife is deranged and his former police chief is dishonest. prosecutors argued bo made millions of dollars illegally and interfered in a murder investigation. he was a rising star in the ruling communist party before the scandal broke. the school year is just getting started in most of the u.s., and already the weather has intervened. severe heat in the midwest today forced schools in at least six states to end classes early. readings reached nearly 100 degrees in much of the region, including nebraska, iowa, minnesota, the dakotas and illinois. many of the affected schools have sections that are not air conditioned. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost 64 points to close at 14,946. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3657. those are some of
would do irreparable harm to the n.s.a.'s ability to collect information, that terrorists were changing their communication patterns. maybe this information in the last few days maybe indicates they haven't changed so much and the n.s.a. isn't as damaged or harmed as some may have thought. >> ifill: sounds like a story that is just beginning to unfold. thank you both so much. >> thank you. >> suarez: now, the sale of a legendary newspaper to an internet legend. the "washington post" company sold its flagship paper to jeff bezos, founder of amazon, for $250 million. one family, the grahams, owned the "post" for four generations. the paper faced financial difficulties. revenues declined for seven consecutive years, including losses of $49 million in the first quarter of this year. for more on the surprising sale, we turn to tom rosenstiel, the executive director of the american press institute, a think tank for journalism. rosenstiel was a veteran newspaper reporter before becoming the founder and director of the pew project for excellence in journalism for many years. tom, if you live so
widely used in the world today. her family never had a say in this. why did the nsa seek its buy-in now? >> what happened this year is different. hela cells, yes, have been used in almost every laboratory, including my own. now what we've had happen is read out the complete d.n.a. instruction book, the genome of hela cells, laying out all kinds of details about why those cells grow so rapidly, but also revealing something about henrietta's original d.n.a. instruction book, which,sh, has implications for the family, and her blood relatives raised concerns, rightly so, that this information being freely available on the internet might be placing them at risk for people learning things about their medical risks for the future, that they would like to keep private. >> warner: so this agreement you negotiated with the family, what does it grant them? what does it give them? >> well, over three long meetings in the evening in baltimore with the family-- and i give them a huge amount of credit for rallying together and dealing with some pretty complicated scientific facts-- ultimately, they ar
and appointing an n.s.a. representative committed to privacy, and inviting outside experts to review how the government does its surveillance. the measures come as the administration has faced mounting scrutiny over its surveillance programs following the leaks from former spy agency contractor edward snowden. mr. obama was asked if today's move changed his mindset about snowden. >> is he now more a whistle- blower than he is a hacker, as you called him at one point, or somebody that shouldn't be filed charges? and should he be provided more protection? is he a patriot? >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference-- and i think the american people's preference-- would have been for a lawful, orderly examination of these laws; a thoughtful, fact-based debate that would then lead us to a better place, because i never made claims that all the surveillance technologies that have developed since the time some of these laws had been put in place someh
for joining us. coming up in the show -- >> a promise from the nsa -- germany's top intelligence minister says the u.s. has offered adeal great >> could israel a someone's doom peace talks before they begin? >> and the row between britain and spain over gibraltar is heating up. london is sending out warships area -- warships.
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
was responded to ve very well. you don't like the nsa -revelations. if you're on the right distrust of big government has always been an article of fate. it's not just cynicism and it's not just media exploitation. there is a genuine reaction against in part philosophically but also what's perceived as the incompetence of government. >> what about the idea or ideal of a public good that has runun through our history.->> the founders of course spent much of their time contemplatingting this idea of a public good trying to set up a situation in which partisan impulses, internal impulses regional impulses, state impulses in which all of these would be tamped down enough that in fact the government would function tamed down now where it will functio gislators who would act in broad public good.egislators that will act in a 1345u8 public small r republican ideal originally.nd of and of course that's worked better and less well over the years since. i think what we really lost now is a conversation about it. i mean it's sort of been taken
from british police. "the guardian" newspaper has destroyed hard drives with nsa documents but says there are safe copies elsewhere. >> the lead him of the muslim brotherhood in egypt has been the white house criticizes the move and considers cutting aid to cairo. >> get them while they are hot -- he gets to the soccer world cup go on sale in brazil
that the n.s.a., which is so prominent in the news these days slistenning carefully to the types of communications going on. now, that communication can sometimes be ambiguous. but if you put all that together, it can clearly point in the direction of one actor in this, and i think there is probably, as has been saished the preponderance of evidence-- public or not public-- falls on the side of the syrian government did this. >> brown: the context is what happened in iraq, where you were involved, where you looked at what happened ooferreds. to what degree as what happened there affected how these kind-- how this kind of work it done? >> well, the weapons inspectors it turned out did a much better job than anybody thought. their teakniques and methods have improved a fair amount. on the other hand, the intelligence community, they've had their fingers burned. they got it massively long in 2002 and 2003. so they are going to be ve reluctant to make categorical statements -- like slam dunk-- to policy makers. they will caveat their language and that will make policy makers' lives m
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)